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WAGNH Chelsea Player of the Year 2019-20

Season review: community ratings and statistics

Photo by GLYN KIRK/AFP via Getty Images

Another season in the books, the 106th in the club’s 114th year of existence. One of the strangest and weirdest, certainly in living memory but perhaps of all time. And certainly the longest, with our first competitive match on August 11, 2019 and our last competitive match on August 8, 2020 — incidentally, with four goals conceded in both.

Of course, we probably should be thankful we even got this far. The COVID-19 pandemic almost succeeded in becoming the first thing that wasn’t a World War to cancel football. But we figured out a way to finish out the season, while Chelsea managed to figure out a way to finish fourth and reach the FA Cup final as well. Job done.

Along the way, y’all have been diligently rating the players, just as you have every season since 2012-13. Imperfect as they may be (unweighted, entirely unscientific, etc.), these ratings are never meant to be taken too seriously, but they are helpful in gauging community sentiment towards the players (while avoiding recency bias).

And they’re also a way for us to award a WAGNH Player of the Season to someone.

The winner should be no surprise. Christian Pulisic has been head and shoulders above everyone in terms of average ratings. While he did miss a solid chunk of the season, when he was fit, and especially after the Restart, he’s been the superstar we were hoping he’d eventually turn into when we agreed to sign him in January 2019.

Congrats, Christian! Here’s to many more seasons at least as good as this, but hopefully even better!


SEASON RATINGS

EXCEPTIONAL (9.0+): —

EXCELLENT (8.0-8.9): —

GOOD (7.0-7.9): Pulisic (7.1)

AVERAGE (6.0-6.9): Kovačić (6.7), Kanté (6.7), Tomori (6.7), James (6.5), Giroud (6.5), Gilmour (6.5), Mount (6.4), Jorginho (6.3), Willian (6.3), Alonso (6.3), Zouma (6.3), Caballero (6.3), Abraham (6.2), Azpilicueta (6.2), Arrizabalaga (6.1), Rüdiger (6.0)

POOR (5.0-5.9): Hudson-Odoi (5.9), Christensen (5.9), Barkley (5.8), Pedro (5.8), Emerson (5.6), Batshuayi (5.4)

BAD (4.0-4.9): —

TERRIBLE (3.0-3.9): —

Here’s a rundown of the players with at least 10 rated appearances to their name, with thoughts and statistics from Expected Chelsea. The first tie-breaker for the rankings was number of Man of the Match awards, the second was number of appearances.

Those who did not collect at least 10 ratings include: Ruben Loftus-Cheek (9), Tariq Lamptey (3), Marc Guehi (2), Tino Anjorin (2), Armando Broja (1), Ian Maatsen (1)


Note: Basic metrics such as goals, assists and appearances pertain to all competitions while advanced metrics are available only for Premier League and Champions League matches.

Stats of note include metrics where a player was the top 3 in the squad this season. If a player didn’t feature in the top 3 of any metric, the criteria was expanded to top 5.

All ranks have been made based on total statistics and not per 90 measures. While using totals instead of per 90s is inherently biased towards players who made a high number of appearances, it can also be viewed as a reward for their durability in what has been a very long season.


Dead Chuck

1. Christian Pulisic (7.1; 12 MoM)

The good
His first year in the Premier League went better than anyone could have possibly expected, especially since the restart. While he is not the same type of player as the legendary Belgian he replaced, there is no reason why cannot be as effective.

Going forward, his aim should be to get double digit goals in the Premier League next season and ideally at least fifteen in competitions.

The bad
While he had inconsistent runs of form across the season, like most young players do, his fitness record is a major concern. It is not often that a 21-year-old has as many muscle and non-contact injuries as Pulisic does.

Pulisic’s progress depends almost totally on how he takes care of himself and avoids injuries.

Highest point of the season
The substitute appearance at Anfield was ultimately in vain but for 30 minutes, Pulisic was the best player on the pitch against the best team in the world. More than the goal, assist and the dribbles, it was the shift in belief once he came on that is the greatest indicator of his potential.

Lowest point of the season
His performance in the defeat to Bournemouth was perhaps indicative of the whole team that day. Lethargic, ineffective and ultimately second best.

Stats of note
34 games (27 starts)
11 goals - Joint 2nd
7 assists - Joint 2nd
8.9 expected goals - 2nd
15 goal creating actions - Joint 2nd - 0.68 per 90
95 shot creating actions - 3rd - 4.3 per 90
81 shots - 3rd - 3.12
64 successful dribbles - 3rd - 2.46 per 90
168 touches in penalty box - 6.46 per 90


Chelsea FC v Tottenham Hotspur - Premier League Photo by Clive Howes - Chelsea FC/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

2. Mateo Kovačić (6.7; 5 MoM)

The good
If there was an NBA-style Most Improved Player award in the league, Kovacic would have been a strong contender. His ability to evade pressure and progress the ball in midfield is exceptional and among the best in the world.

While Kovacic is not world class yet, one gets the impression he can take the step up soon. It is not easy by any means and Kovacic will need to become significantly better at defending while also improving in the final third but there is no reason to believe why he cannot reach the upper echelons of midfielders.

The bad
Kovacic quite simply hasn’t played enough this season. He has played roughly 65% of the team’s minutes in all competitions and 60% in the league. This suggests one of two things – he wasn’t able to keep himself fit or the manager didn’t rely on him went fit.

Highest point of the season
A terrific display away at Man City, where he defied their press and progressed the ball at every possible opportunity.

Lowest point of the season
A dismal performance in the Champions League dead rubber against Bayern Munich. The match remains fresh in memory and not much needs to be said.

Stats of note
47 appearances (37 starts)
2 goals
3 assists
84 successful dribbles - 2nd - 2.31 per 90
216 passes into final third - 2nd - 5.93 per 90
232 successful pressures - 2nd - 6.37 (32.6% success)
68 tackles won - 1.87 per 90
712 attempted pressures - 3rd - 19.6 per 90


Lille OSC v Chelsea FC: Group H - UEFA Champions League Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images

3. N’Golo Kanté (6.7; 4 MoM)

The good
Chelsea’s only world-class player stepped up in big games and spent the pre-lockdown part of the season continuing in the more attacking role given last season. He transitioned into a more traditional defensive midfielder since the restart and showed highly encouraging signs.

The bad
Kante’s injuries are a real cause of concern for fans and staff alike. No solid long-term plan can be created with questions over the fitness of the team’s best player. It remains to be seen if his injuries are merely a function of poor management from last season and earlier this season or if they indicate something more serious.

Highest point of the season
His display against Liverpool in the Super Cup is one of the best individual Chelsea displays in recent memory. Everything one could have possibly asked from a midfielder, Kante delivered.

Lowest point of the season
His slip against Arsenal let them back into the game during a phase where Chelsea thoroughly had the upper hand. That moment perhaps summed up whole season – uncharacteristic.

Stats of note
28 appearances (26 starts)
3 goals
0 assists
53 tackles won - 4th - 2.07 per 90
56 interceptions - 4th - 2.12 per 90
331 loose-ball recoveries - 4th - 12.92 per 90


Hull City v Chelsea FC - FA Cup Fourth Round Photo by Alex Dodd - CameraSport via Getty Images

4. Fikayo Tomori (6.7; 2 MoM)

The good
Stood up excellently to some of the best attackers on the planet such as Mo Salah and Sergio Aguero. Showed little signs of nervousness when in form.

The bad
Was dropped with little explanation and was demoted to the status of fourth centre-back for the entirety of 2020. Where does Tomori go from here? Only time will tell.

Highest point of the season
Performed excellently at the Amsterdam Arena, delivering a masterclass in defending on the ground against a team that finished in the Champions League semis the previous season.

Lowest point of the season
A shaky display at Bournemouth proved to be the last piece of meaningful action he got this season.

Stats of note
22 appearances (21 starts)
2 goals
1 assist
10 shots blocked - joint 3rd - 0.48 per 90
111 clearances - 5th - 5.36 per 90


Chelsea FC v AFC Ajax: Group H - UEFA Champions League Photo by Sebastian Frej/MB Media/Getty Images

5. Reece James (6.5; 4 MoM)

The good
Showed strong glimpses of his creative potential, especially his crossing. With better attackers next season, one gets the impression James’ assist tally could improve dramatically next season.

The bad
Left a lot to be desired defensively, although he did show signs of improving as the season went on.

Highest point of the season
Scoring the equalizer in the epic 4-4 draw against Ajax is hard to top as far individual moments ago. The performance against Burnley at home was perhaps his best game of the season and showed why he is rated so highly.

Lowest point of the season
The hiding he received at the hands of Alphonso Davies at Stamford Bridge, with the Canadian’s pace and skill proving way too much to handle.

Stats of note
37 appearances (26 starts)
2 goals
3 assists
41 passes into the penalty area - 3rd - 1.54 per 90
10 shots blocked - Joint 3rd - 0.38 per 90


Chelsea FC v Norwich City - Premier League Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

6. Olivier Giroud (6.5; 3 MoM)

The good
After nearly leaving the club in January, Giroud bounced back in the best possible way with a slew of goals and excellent all-round performances. The way he dealt with being benched by Lampard will no doubt act as an example to others.

The bad
Not much of note.

Highest point of the season
His display in the home win against Tottenham was a masterclass in target man play – taking shots from dangerous locations, winning duels in the air and bringing his teammates into play.

Lowest point of the season
He was brought back from the cold for the home loss to West Ham and like fellow veteran Pedro, let the team down. His misses in the first half, in particular, were difficult to digest.

Stats of note:
25 appearances (17 starts)
10 goals
1 assist


Chelsea FC v Liverpool FC - FA Cup Fifth Round Photo by Chris Lee/Chelsea FC

7. Billy Gilmour (6.5; 2 MoM)

The good
Impressive preseason performances turned into a few early-season cameos before the teenager took center stage in the game just before the pandemic struck, stepping in to run the Chelsea midfield in the absences of Kovačić, Kanté, and Jorginho.

The bad
Came back down to earth after the Restart, but just as he was finding his feet again, he picked up a knee injury, which required surgery. And unfortunately that recovery will cause him to miss part of the next season as well, which will affect his development.

Highest point of the season
Running the show against Merseyside, first against Liverpool in the FA Cup, then against Everton in the league. The nutmeg on Fabino was especially glorious.

Lowest point of the season
Getting subbed off at half-time against Leicester City in the following round of the FA Cup.

Stats of note
11 appearances (6 starts)


Chelsea FC v Leicester City - Premier League Photo by Clive Howes - Chelsea FC/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

8. Mason Mount (6.4; 3 MoM)

The good
His engine, intensity, availability and maturity were well beyond his age. It is not a stretch to say Mount was perhaps the most important player in the team this season and might well continue to hold that tag next season despite the addition of superstar attackers. Without him, the team quite simply cannot function in the way they press and win the ball back.

The bad
The downside of making him play every game is the inevitable inconsistency it brings. His run of form from the Aston Villa game in December to the Everton game in March did not make for pretty viewing except for the two games against Spurs.

It is not a major drawback by any means, it must be clarified. Every young player goes through bad forms and Mount did his time too.

Highest point of the season
When the team needed someone to step up against Wolves, it was Mount who duly delivered. The team were not particularly good but with Mount playing the way he did, they were not needed to. Both Spurs games deserve honorable mentions too.

Lowest point of the season
His display at Anfield in May was uncharacteristically poor. He missed a reasonable chance early in the game and that seemed to have set the tone for the rest of the night.

Stats of note
53 appearances (42 starts)
8 goals
5 assists
5 expected assists - 3rd
18 goal creating actions - 1st - 0.49 per 90
882 pressures attempted - 1st - 21.3 per 90
249 successful pressures - 1st - 6 per 90 (28.2% success)
60 key passes - 2nd - 1.45 per 90
129 shot creating actions - 2nd - 3.5 per 90
102 shots - 2nd - 2.46 per 90
39 shots on target - 2nd - 0.92 per 90 (38.2% on target)
173 touches in the penalty box - 2nd - 4.17 per 90


Chelsea FC v Norwich City - Premier League Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

9. Jorginho (6.3, 3 MoM)

The good
Transitioned into a leader in the dressing room and a mentor of sorts for younger players. Showed a lot of self-belief to bounce back from a difficult debut season too. His metrics, as always, were very solid though they do not convey the whole story.

The bad
His weaknesses were exploited despite his best efforts. His work-rate cannot be faulted, neither can his mentality be doubted, but there are serious questions over his ability and suitability to the Premier League.

Highest point of the season
A virtuoso display against Watford where he racked up a scarcely believable number of passes and touches, along with a terrific assist.

Lowest point of the season
Was arguably the worst player on the pitch in the 2-2 draw at Bournemouth, in a performance where nothing came off.

Stats of note
49 appearances (39 starts)
7 goals (6 penalties)
2 assists
287 passes into final third - 1st - 7.36 per 90
492 recoveries - 1st - 12.61 per 90
88 interceptions - Joint 1st - 2.26 per 90
749 pressures attempted - 2nd - 19.2 per 90
241 progressive passes - 2nd - 6.18 per 90
58 tackles won - 3rd - 1.49 per 90
212 successful pressures - Joint 3rd - 5.44 per 90 (28.3% success)


Chelsea FC v Everton FC - Premier League Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

10. Willian (6.3; 2 MoM)

The good
Set a wonderful example for the likes of Pulisic and Hudson-Odoi with his professionalism and work ethic on and off the field. His run of goal contributions either side of the break was crucial in Chelsea getting a top 4 spot too.

The bad
Inconsistency plagued him at different points of the season, just as it has throughout his Chelsea career. The conduct of his agent was not necessarily endearing either.

Highest point of the season
A brace away at Tottenham takes the cake here. His infectious energy, skill and creativity were all on fore that afternoon.

Lowest point of the season
It was sad for him to bow out the way he did against Liverpool, with a missed chance and an all-round poor performance.

Stats of note
47 appearances (38 starts)
11 goals (4 penalties) - Joint 2nd
9 assists - 1st
8.3 expected goals (5.2 excluding penalties) - 3rd
8.8 expected assists - 3rd
91 key passes - 1st - 2.44 per 90
85 successful dribbles - 1st - 2.28 per 90
182 shot creating actions - 1st - 5.24 per 90
15 goal creating actions - Joint 2nd - 0.43
240 progressive passes - 3rd - 6.43 per 90
32 shots on target - 3rd - 0.86 (40.5% on target)


Chelsea FC v Tottenham Hotspur - Premier League Photo by Chloe Knott - Danehouse/Getty Images

11. Marcos Alonso (6.3; 1 MoM)

The good
Stepped up admirably when Chelsea switched to a back 3, offering some badly needed width on the left.

The bad
His usual weaknesses in a back 4 were evident across the season, even though he managed to perform reasonably well for a stretch during the restart.

Highest point of the season
A goal and a strong all-round display at home to Tottenham, in a game where Chelsea desperately needed three points.

Lowest point of the season
Hooked at half time against Ajax in the 4-4 draw due to his inability to defend Ziyech and Mazraoui.

Stats of note
29 appearances (26 starts)
4 goals
2 assists


Ajax v Chelsea - UEFA Champions League - Group H - Johan Cruijff ArenA Photo by Tim Goode/EMPICS/PA Images via Getty Images

12. Kurt Zouma (6.3)

The good
Was arguably the team’s best, and most consistent, central defender across the season. His ability to look good despite playing with different partners and alternating between the left and right of the defence was commendable.

The bad
While he was good this season, he is a fair distance away from being among the best in the world and that is the level Chelsea need to reach. It will be interesting to see if he is capable of making the step up soon. Zouma gives the impression that he is better off being the secondary centre-back rather than a leader.

Highest point of the season
A last ditch tackle on Christian Benteke to snatch the three points at Selhurst Park.

Lowest point of the season
An all-round nervous performance away at Everton, with Zouma partially at fault for at least two of the three goals conceded.

Stats of note
43 appearances (40 starts)
1 goal
1 assist
116 aerial duels won - 1st - 2.82 per 90 (78.9% success)
211 clearances - 1st - 5.12 per 90
71 interceptions - 2nd - 1.72 per 90
20 shots blocked - 2nd - 0.49 per 90
362 loose-ball recoveries - 3rd - 8.78 per 90


Chelsea v Tottenham Hotspur - Premier League Photo by Ivan Yordanov/MI News/NurPhoto via Getty Images

13. Willy Caballero (6.3)

The good
Was asked to step in not once but twice and did a reasonably good job all things considered. His presence against Leicester and Manchester United in the FA Cup and Wolves in the Premier League offered a layer of confidence to the defenders ahead of him.

The bad
Was not actually much better than Kepa in terms of shot-stopping.

Highest point of the season
The performance away at Leicester in the cup, keeping a clean sheet at the home of a team then in the top 4.

Lowest point of the season
The performance away at Leicester in the league, with his hyperactive style of goalkeeping unsettling a nervous defence that was nervous already.

Stats of note:
14 appearances
65.6 expected save % in the league.
56.25 actual save % in the league.


Arsenal FC v Chelsea FC - Premier League Photo by Visionhaus

14. Tammy Abraham (6.2; 4 MoM)

The good
18 non-penalty goals in his first season at a big club is by all means excellent. To put it into perspective, the only other players to score 15 non-penalty league goals in a single season for Chelsea in the 21st century are Diego Costa, Didier Drogba, Nicolas Anelka and Jimmy-Floyd Hasselbaink.

The bad
A freak injury against Arsenal in early 2020, aggravated by playing on in the next few games, ruined the momentum he had built over 2019. Things like this happen and this mini-break will give him a chance to refresh.

Highest point of the season
His late winner at the Emirates had more than a few shades of Drogba about it, right from the timing and execution to the celebration.

Lowest point of the season
He is not likely to look back at his display at St. James Park with fondness. He missed multiple chances and he was made to pay by a late winner from Newcastle.

Stats of note
47 appearances (33 starts)
18 goals - 1st
4 assists
19 expected goals - 1st
111 shots - 1st - 3.38
45 shots on target - 1st - 1.37 (40.5% on target)
204 touches in penalty box - 1st - 6.22 per 90
90 aerial duels won - 3rd - 2.74 per 90 (42.3% success)


Chelsea FC v Arsenal FC - Premier League Photo by Visionhaus

15. César Azpilicueta (6.2; 1 MoM)

The good
Was perhaps the team’s most consistent player after an initial bad patch. Week in week out, Azpilicueta could be depended upon to be one of the team’s best players regardless of the positions he played in.

The bad
Suffered his first injury as a Chelsea player right at the end of the campaign. There has been little news since regarding his recovery and Frank Lampard will be hoping that his captain returns sooner than later.

Highest point of the season
A pair of well-earned assists against Aston Villa in the first game after restart capped off a turnaround in a game which the team needed to win with tougher assignments on the horizon.

Lowest point of the season
The cup final against Arsenal. A penalty conceded and a serious injury on top of it.

Stats of note
49 appearances (48 starts)
4 goals
7 assists - Joint 2nd
6.3 expected assists - 3rd
342 progressive passes - 1st - 7.14 per 90
77 tackles won - 1st - 1.61 per 90
22 shots blocked - 1st - 0.46 per 90
88 interceptions - Joint 1st - 1.84 per 90
68 passes into penalty third - 2nd - 1.42
109 aerial duels won - 2nd - 2.28 per 90 (61% success)
166 clearances - 2nd - 3.47 per 90
439 loose-ball recoveries - 9.16 per 90
49 key passes - 3rd - 1.02 per 90
175 passes into final third - 3rd - 3.65


Chelsea v Everton - English Premier League Photo by Jacques Feeney/MI News/NurPhoto via Getty Images

16. Kepa Arrizabalaga (6.1; 3 Mom)

The good
Showed excellent mental toughness to bounce back from being dropped in March. Saved a crucial penalty in the Champions League game at Valencia.

The bad
Did not save much otherwise, with his confidence dwindling with every passing week. By the point he was dropped for the second time, he was a shell of the confident player who had arrived from Bilbao.

Highest point of the season
The triple save against Liverpool in the FA Cup.

Lowest point of the season
The game against Arsenal at Stamford Bridge, where the Gunners scored from their only two shots over 90 minutes.

Stats of note:
41 appearances
64.54 expected save % in the league.
54.54 actual save % in the league.
59.44 expected save % in the Champions League.
61.11 actual save % in the Champions League.


Tottenham Hotspur v Chelsea FC - Premier League Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

17. Antonio Rüdiger (6.0; 1 MoM)

The good
His presence provided a degree of leadership in the dressing room, with multiple players referring to his influence off-the-field. Had a budding partnership with Zouma in the spell where Chelsea won against the likes of Everton, Liverpool and Leicester.

The bad
His return from injury in December resulted in Lampard breaking up the Tomori – Zouma axis which had proven to be solid until then. Chelsea’s defense, having looked reasonably solid for a while, was never the same after that.

Highest point of the season
A brace at the King Power stadium to earn the team a point in a game where they were comfortably the second-best.

Lowest point of the season
An error-strewn display away at West Ham.

Stats of note:
26 appearances (25 starts)
2 goals
0 assists
117 clearances - 4th - 4.7 per 90
65 aerial duels won - 5th - 2.61 per 90 (65.7% success)
121 passes into final third - 5th - 4.86 per 90


Chelsea FC v Burnley FC - Premier League Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

18. Callum Hudson-Odoi (5.9; 2 MoM)

The good
He returned ahead of schedule from a very serious injury and that alone is reason enough to view this season as a success. He showed flashes of potential at various points in the season, with his creativity standing out in particular.

After Ziyech, Hudson-Odoi will be the best final third passer at the club and he will receive plenty of chances. He just needs to take them.

The bad
He was struck by injuries at frustrating points this season. He was playing superbly well in January and February when a hamstring injury ruled him out until the lockdown. Illness on returning did not help things either.

Highest point of the season
His performance against Arsenal at home was reminiscent of the ones Hazard used to deliver regularly – taking players on, being creative and creating plenty of chances. It was a massive shame that he got injured soon after, in a promising first half against Leicester.

Lowest point of the season
The rape allegations in May came as a shock to everyone associated with the club and while he was eventually cleared, Hudson-Odoi needs to understand that he needs to cut out his mistakes soon.

To make it clear, this is not meant as a dig towards his attitude, which by all accounts is thoroughly fantastic. Everyone makes mistakes while they are young and Callum is no different, but he needs to cut them out soon like high-achievers do.

Stats of note
33 appearances (13 stars)
3 goals
6 assists - 4th
43 successful dribbles - 5th - 2.61 per 90


Borussia Moenchengladbach v FC Chelsea - Pre-Season Friendly Photo by Christian Verheyen/Borussia Moenchengladbach via Getty Images

19. Andreas Christensen (5.9)

The good
On his day, Christensen is arguably among the best ball-playing defenders in the league. His reading of the game, composure and decision-making are all note-worthy.

The bad
In simple words, he is far too inconsistent to be a regular starter at Chelsea. His tendency to go from sublime to ridiculous in the span of days is bewildering to say the least.

The problem with Christensen is not merely limited to his athleticism or bravery. His lack of concentration is something that needs to be fixed quickly too.

Highest point of the season
A flawless display against Manchester City at home.

Lowest point of the season
His inability to stay switched on was ruthlessly exploited by Sheffield United, forcing him to be subbed off after just 45 minutes.

Stats of note
28 appearances (23 starts)
0 goals
0 assists
131 clearances - 3rd - 5.04 per 90
10 shots blocked - Joint 3rd - 0.38 per 90
73 aerial duels won - 4th - 2.81 per 90 (62.4% success)
39 interceptions - 5th - 1.5 per 90


Chelsea FC v Watford FC - Premier League Photo by Chris Lee - Chelsea FC/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

20. Ross Barkley (5.8)

The good
Acted as a reliable rotation option and popped up with crucial goal contributions. While he is clearly not someone to rely on in big games, there is no reason to believe why cannot be a squad player.

The bad
His off-field transgressions earlier in the season did not make for pretty reading and were not befitting of a Chelsea player.

Highest point of the season
Showed why he was called the Scouse Lampard in his youth with a stunning individual display against Liverpool in the FA Cup.

Lowest point of the season
Demanded to take the penalty against Valencia and fluffed his lines. Thankfully it did not cost the team in terms of qualification but in another year, it could have.

Stats of note
31 appearances (19 starts)
5 goals
5 assists


Chelsea FC v Everton FC - Premier League Photo by Chris Lee - Chelsea FC/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

21. Pedro (5.8)

The good
Stayed professional despite not receiving a lot of chances during the course of the season. He perhaps did not receive a memorable goodbye from the club but that should not diminish his contributions over the past few years.

The bad
When he did play, he was ineffective more often than not and it was clear to see why Lampard was ready to keep Willian but not him.

Highest point of the season
A stellar display against Everton at home, with Pedro contributing to the opening two goals.

Lowest point of the season
An ineffective display in the home defeat to West Ham, where he received a rare start in the league.

Stats of note
22 appearances (13 starts)
2 goals (1 penalty)
3 assists


Arsenal v Chelsea - FA Cup Final Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC via Getty Images

22. Emerson Palmieri (5.6; 1 MoM)

The good
Started the season well, offering glimpses of the potential that convinced Chelsea to sign him.

The bad
Did not contribute anything meaningful going forward and was torrid defensively after the patch of good form at the beginning of the season.

Highest point of the season
A strong display at Norwich where he held his own defensively before linking up with Mount to devastating effect.

Lowest point of the season
Not clearing the ball in the home game against Arsenal when Tammy Abraham was clearly injured, culminating in Bellerin scoring an undeserved equalizer.

Stats of note
21 appearances (18 starts)
0 goals
1 assist


FBL-ENG-LCUP-CHELSEA-MAN UTD Photo by BEN STANSALL/AFP via Getty Images

23. Michy Batshuayi (5.4; 1 MoM)

The good
Was a reasonably good bench option in the first few months of the season.

The bad
Was was not particularly good after his initial run of form.

Highest point of the season
His winner against Ajax will remain long in the memory of Chelsea fans. He has a knack of picking up crucial winning goals such as the one here, against Atletico Madrid and against West Brom.

Lowest point of the season
Was given a golden chance against Man United at home and had a miserable night. Got kicked in the private parts, could not win duels and missed a good chance – it doesn’t get much worse than that.

Stats of note:
24 appearances (5 starts)
6 goals
2 assists


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