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Super League suspended as Chelsea, others withdraw, having actually thought about it now

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Good job guys

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In this photo illustration, the UK football teams that are... Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Chelsea may have drawn 0-0 against Brighton on Tuesday, but in the grand scheme of things, we still emerged as winners by knocking over the house of cards that was The Super League, which has now confirmed that it has suspended operations, if you can call it that.

Mayflies might live longer than the roughly 48 hours for which this thing engulfed our lives.

Chelsea’s reported decision to start filing the necessary paperwork to withdraw from this harebrained operation was the first domino to fall, swiftly followed by Manchester City, and eventually all the other Premier League-based teams as well. Manchester United’s Ed Woodward, one of the chief ringleaders of this effort, has even resigned. City beat us to the punch in terms of actually filing the paperwork and officially confirming the decision, but Chelsea eventually released a statement late in the night as well.

Try not to laugh-cry as you read it.

As reported earlier this evening, Chelsea Football Club can confirm that it has begun the formal procedures for withdrawal from the group developing plans for a European Super League.

Having joined the group late last week, we have now had time to consider the matter fully and have decided that our continued participation in these plans would not be in the best interests of the Club, our supporters or the wider football community.

-Chelsea statement

So basically, we panicked and didn’t think it through at all. (Even though the idea of a super league is not new and talks about this specific version of it had been happening for months, if not years.) Good job, guys.

This is not the last time we will have heard of The Super League, or some sort of soft-Super League, especially with UEFA’s recently confirmed changes to the Champions League for 2024 looking suspiciously like one already — and that’s before reports of UEFA seeking a €6 billion financing package, which is significantly bigger than The Super League had in the first place.

Money talks. But we’re safe in the status quo, with UEFA and all its faults and flaws, for now.